Archive for October, 2012

Is it possible for someone to have Celiac’s disease but not have any digestive problems?

Question by Sarah Jane: Is it possible for someone to have Celiac’s disease but not have any digestive problems?

Best answer:

Answer by Carly
Definitely. I have Celiac and my only symptom at the time I was diagnosed was that I had started to break out in hives whenever I ate something with gluten. My dad has Celiac and because it’s a genetic disease (although I’ve heard of it being triggered in people with no family history of it) that’s where I started. If you go to celiaccentral.org you can find a list of symptoms, many of which have nothing to do with digestion. Celiac.com is also a good website for information. Some things I had written off as entirely different problems (eczema, tingling sensations in my back, etc.) are actually symptoms of Celiac and stopped once I got on the gluten-free diet.

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Posted by GlutenFree - October 31, 2012 at 1:47 pm

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Q&A: Can Celiac Disease cause blood in the stool?

Question by Mike G: Can Celiac Disease cause blood in the stool?
I had a physical exam about 6 years ago that included 3 stool samples. Analysis indicated blood in all 3 samples though not visible to the naked eye. A colonoscopy did not indicate anything unusual and I was told not to worry about it. Last year one of my physicians suspects that I have Celiac Disease, an autoimmune disorder characterized by a food protein (gluten) that when ingested damages the inner lining of the small intestines. I wonder if that could be the source of minute amounts of blood loss in my stools? Anyone with a similar scenario or familiar with this?

Best answer:

Answer by biogal
Many things can cause blood in the stool. Celiac disease is one of them. Five years ago one of my three stool samples was questionable for blood. I was also anemic and had digestive problems for many years. The doctor sent me for an upper endoscopy and a colonoscopy. Everything looked fine, so they did not take any biopsies to check for celiac. I did not know about celiac disease then, and no one suggested that this could be the problem. Three years later I developed Dermatitis Herpetiformis (blistery rash) and was diagnosed with Celiac with a duodenal biopsy and blood tests. I believe the blood in the stool comes from the inflammation in the intestines due to the autoimmune reaction against the gluten.

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Posted by GlutenFree - October 30, 2012 at 1:33 pm

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Q&A: I might have Celiac disease-should I go into the doctor or just go on a gluten/wheat free diet?

Question by Kiki: I might have Celiac disease-should I go into the doctor or just go on a gluten/wheat free diet?
Anyone have any meal/snack suggestions? Lunch is the hardest.

Best answer:

Answer by grlwiththegreeneyes

Hi my name is Li Lindsey and I have had celiac for 7 going on 8 years

If you are not sure if you have celiac you should definitely go to your doctor and have them order the “celiac panel” which is the blood test that diagnoses celiac. And you should not go on a gluten free diet until you get the results. Going on the gluten free diet before hand can cause a false negative on the blood test. Also over eating gluten would cause a false positive.

You should definitely go get check out by your doctor before jumping to any conclusions.

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Posted by GlutenFree - October 23, 2012 at 1:23 pm

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Anyone have a gluten-free pizza crust recipe – I have celiac’s disease?

Question by Tammy P: Anyone have a gluten-free pizza crust recipe – I have celiac’s disease?
I love pizza and I take my gluten-free glutino bagels and make them into pizza

But I would love to make homemade pizza crust also

any good recipes- there are none online that i care for

Best answer:

Answer by ALEX
This gluten-free pizza crust recipe can be rolled out, just like traditional wheat dough. You can make a thin crusted New York style pizza or thick crusted Chicago style, you decide. Then load it with your favorite toppings.

Use this recipe for Homemade Gluten-Free Flour Blend or your favorite GF all-purpose flour blend.

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Ingredients:
3/4 cup Gluten Free All Purpose Flour Mix
3/4 cup tapioca flour
2 tablespoons dry buttermilk powder OR dry powdered milk OR Vance’s Dari-Free Powder
1 teaspoon Agar-Agar powder (Vegan ) OR unflavored gelatin powder
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons xanthan gum
1 package active dry yeast granules
1 teaspoons sugar OR 1/2 teaspoon honey OR agave nectar
2 teaspoons olive oil
1 1/2 teaspoons cider vinegar
1/2 cup lukewarm water (hot water will kill the yeast!)
Extra tapioca flour for rolling the pizza dough
Gluten Free cornmeal to sprinkle on baking sheet
Preparation:
Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper and sprinkle lightly with gluten free cornmeal.
Place all dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl and whisk until thoroughly mixed together.
Add sugar or honey or agave nectar, vinegar, olive oil and gradually add water.
Mix on high speed for 3 to 4 minutes.
Scrape the thick dough on to a large clean surface liberally sprinkled with tapioca flour.
Work enough tapioca flour into the dough so that it can be shaped into a large ball. With a large knife cut the dough in half to make two medium pizzas.

The key to shaping this dough is to continue to sprinkle the work surface and the dough with tapioca flour.

Shape each piece into a circle making sure to sprinkle enough tapioca flour on the dough and the work surface to prevent it from sticking.
With a rolling pin shape the dough into circles. Roll thin for New York style pizzas or thick for Chicago deep dish style.
Carefully place one prepared pizza crust on baking sheet or pizza stone (see tips) sprinkled with corn meal and bake for about 5 minutes or until the dough is firm. This is called parbaking. Repeat with second pizza.
Top pizzas with your favorite ingredients and bake an additional 7-10 minutes or until done. Or cool parbaked crusts, wrap and freeze for convenience.

Yield: 1 large, or 2 medium or 3 small pizza crusts

Tip

A pizza stone creates crisp crusts by absorbing moisture in dough. If you like your pizzas crisp consider using a pizza stone.

Reminder: Always make sure your work surfaces, utensils, pans and tools are free of gluten. Always read product labels. Manufacturers can change product formulations without notice. When in doubt, do not buy or use a product before contacting the manufacturer for verification that the product is free of gluten.

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Posted by GlutenFree - October 22, 2012 at 1:48 pm

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If a blood test shows I don’t have celiac disease, then do I 100% for sure not have it?

Question by Jake G: If a blood test shows I don’t have celiac disease, then do I 100% for sure not have it?
If I get tested for celiac disease and the results show I don’t have it, I heard I could still be allergic to gluten.
Is this true?
Sounds dumb… I mean if I don’t have it, then I don’t have it.

Best answer:

Answer by Nah Z
SOME people can have false negatives on the blood test. If you have significant gastro symptoms, your doctor can insert a camera into your belly to see if the disease is present or not, or to try and find out some other cause for your symptoms. Talk to your doctor about if this is appropriate.

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Posted by GlutenFree - October 19, 2012 at 1:22 pm

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Q&A: I have Hoshimoto’s hypothyroidism. Should I be worried about celiac disease?

Question by Ashley: I have Hoshimoto’s hypothyroidism. Should I be worried about celiac disease?
I have been going untreated for my thryroid disease for months now due to a lack of health coverage. Recently, I have been experiencing a loss of appetite, abdominal pain, nausea (no vomiting), and diarrhea. I have heard that there may be a link between celiac and hypothyroidism and am now concerned that I should be screened for celiac. Should I be worried or do I just have some kind of stomach bug?

Best answer:

Answer by Harley Drive

A stomach bug doesn’t last that long so if your symptoms continue then it is likely to be from another condition. These symptoms could be from Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis itself, low vitamin B12 or magnesium levels which are commonly associated with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, or celiac’s disease.

“Relative risks of almost all other autoimmune diseases in Graves’ disease or Hashimoto’s thyroiditis were significantly increased (>10 for pernicious anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus, Addison’s disease, celiac disease, and vitiligo).”

90% with hashimoto’s has genetic defects with vitamin D absorption so the odds you have vitamin D deficiency is extremely high. Without vitamin D you cannot absorb calcium or magnesium effectively. Blood tests are recommended but of course if you cannot afford it, then my suggestions are: supplementing with vitamin B12 (sublingual – under the tongue), magnesium, calcium and vitamin D and go on a gluten free diet. A gluten free diet is shown to lower thyroid antibodies. Also, a must is selenium (about 4 brazil nuts a day). Selenium is shown in clinical trials to lower TPO thyroid antibodies.

If you cannot afford supplementing, then increase your diet with magnesium, calcium and vitamin B12 rich foods and go out into the sun daily between 10 – 2 for about 20 minutes – no sunscreen which blocks UVB rays that create vitamin D. This said, if you have a deficiency this may not be enough. If you have autoimmune pernicious anaemia, then it is essential to take sublingual vitamin B12 to bypass the digestive tract.

Hashimoto’s slows down your metabolism leaving digestion very slow and incomplete thyroxine is cheaply available on the internet and a dose of 100-150 mcg a day will combat hashimoto’s, talk it over with your health adviser.

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Posted by GlutenFree - October 17, 2012 at 1:32 pm

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Can Gluten make someone break out with acne even if they don’t have celiac disease?

Question by Christian: Can Gluten make someone break out with acne even if they don’t have celiac disease?
I’m trying to figure out why I’ve been breaking out so long and I was wondering if it was my diet. Someone please help me..

Best answer:

Answer by embellishment3
Hi yes before I was diagnosed with gluten intolerant my skin would break out. After eradicating the culprit foods that caused it your skin then starts to clear up. Eat healthy and everything fresh. Drink plenty of fresh water and do not use creams on your face. A bit of time and perseverance then your skin will clear up.

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Posted by GlutenFree - October 16, 2012 at 1:41 pm

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Healthy Food Choices: Gluten-Free Fruits

It would be devastating not to be able to have something you totally love for quite a stretch of time. What more if you can’t have it for all eternity? Case in point: people who are diagnosed with gluten intolerance.

We know all too well how they’re supposed to rid themselves of food with gluten for all eternity. Imagine a pizza and pasta lover who is diagnosed with gluten intolerance. Disheartening indeed.

However, with the advances in almost everything today, there are loads of gluten-free choices available in the market.

How to buy fruit that doesn’t have gluten, you may ask. Watch this video and learn how to have your diet tailor-fitted your specific health and nutrition needs in this video on grocery shopping.

 

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Posted by Chloe Boggs - October 15, 2012 at 1:31 pm

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A Healthy Gluten Free Breakfast To Jumpstart Your Day

Before we move on with the rest of this article, you should know that being allergic to gluten is not yet the end of the world. Yes that is easy to say for those who are not experiencing it. But  come to think of it, it does not make you less of a person. So hang in there and read on. You will surely stumble onto something worthwhile.

In definition, Celiac Disease is a disorder involving the genetics that affects the immune system. The harmful factor here is the gluten which is a type of amino acid found in several food stuff. Once a person allergic to gluten takes in such kind, it will pose serious damage to the body’s bowel lining. Current statistics show that about a percent of the world’s population is suffering from various gastrointestinal signs and symptoms. The only known long term answer to this problem is through maintaining a gluten free diet. Eating is one of the most well loved thing to do. But if you have Celiac Disease, this would not be the case. You would have to stay away from gluten rich food such as bread, biscuits, sausages, biscuits and the list goes on. But here is a little secret where you can still enjoy your meal, gluten free.

Most people would agree that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. It wakes up your senses that are still in slumber and it rejuvenates the body after long hours of sleep. To achieve the optimum amount of nutrients, one should have a variety of foodstuff in one meal. For the gluten free ones, you can opt for bread, pancakes and potato waffles that are of course not containing gluten but rich in protein, vitamins, minerals and calcium. Good news is all fresh meat and fish are gluten free but make sure that these were not processed with flour. The same condition applies with fruits and vegetables.

Being the master of your body, you should let them see who’s boss. So if you are indeed handling your condition well on your own then you should begin to get to know it all the more and use the information to your advantage.

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Posted by Chloe Boggs - October 11, 2012 at 1:47 pm

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Gluten antibodies and Celiac Disease question?

Question by Badriya: Gluten antibodies and Celiac Disease question?
I’m just wondering about the process of being diagnosed with CD. I know a blood test is usually done first to check for antibodies to gluten. If found, I’ve read they do a biopsy. My question…why do the biopsy? What other condition would produce antibodies to gluten? And if there are any, wouldn’t the treatment be the same? Just trying to avoid an unnecessary procedure – if possible!

Thanks!

Best answer:

Answer by Glutenfreegirl
Hi! I hope I can help.
Sadly there are several reasons the ENDOSCOPY with biopsy (be sure its an endo, not a colonoscopy) is the gold standard.
For one, some people with Celiac are IGG and IGA deficient. Those are only two of the antibodies they test for in Celiac. But if you don’t make those antibodies, you will ALWAYS test negative for Celiac in blood tests yet you still have it.

Secondly, other common allergies can cause IGG and IGA levels to go up. Those antibodies just show that your body is reacting wrong to something–could be an allergy, could be an intolerance or Celiac Disease.

Thirdly, labs can be wrong! They not do the right test, they can do it wrong, or the patient may not have eaten enough gluten to make the test right (if u have Celiac u have to eat gluten for the blood test or endoscopy to be right so they can see the damage.)

The endoscopy is the best way bc it allows the doc (who needs to be an EXPERIENCED GI with celiac understanding). to see how much damage is done, or if there could be other reasons than Celiac for your issues.

That being said, not every Celiac has a positive diagnosis at all! I mean, some ppl do not have access to such tests nor can they afford it, so they do the elimination diet and self diagnose themselves Celiac (not recommended) or they do genetic testing. Genetic testing is fairly accurate but it only tells u IF you carry the genes for Celiac, not whether u actually have an active case or how much damage is done.

I was diagnosed by blood work only and chose to avoid the scope for financial reasons and bc of pregnancy or other issues. The blood tests were positive for me and the diet works so that’s all the answer I need!

I hope that helps! feel free to email me for more help or use these links!

www.csaceliacs.org
www.celiac.com
www.celiac.org

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Posted by GlutenFree - October 9, 2012 at 1:20 pm

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