Posts tagged "celiacs"

My girlfriend just got diagnosed with Celiacs disease. I need a list of some Gluten-Free foods?

Question by Youth in Asia: My girlfriend just got diagnosed with Celiacs disease. I need a list of some Gluten-Free foods?
Anybody actually have a gluten free diet? I know the stuff you can pull off Google, like arrowhead root and stuff but I’d like some practical stuff. Like McD’s Fries I hear are acceptable. Anybody got great meal ideas or anything?

Best answer:

Answer by tiggsy
Nope. Macdonalds fries are not edible for celiacs. They are reconstituted with flour.

So far as fast food goes, most of it will be off the menu for your gf. Even the odd bits, like salad without dressing, may well be contaminated by being handled with implements that were previously used for other things.

There are places you can get gluten free food to go, but they are not your regular places, mostly. Though I believe that Wendy’s salad bar has a fairly good selection – but since it’s serve it yourself, it’s very likely somebody will have used the same spoon to pick up croutons and then salad… cross contamination.

Even a hint of gluten will damage your gf’s health. The life exptectancy of celiacs has been shown to be directly related to how well they adhere to a 100% gluten free diet.

Gluten is the protein in wheat, rye, barley, spelt and a few other closely related grains. It’s not in corn, rice, or oats, although oats are mostly contaminated during processing, so you would need to buy ones that are certified gluten free (meaning they were processed in a gluten free environment).

Your girlfriend is going to get a crash course in label reading – unless she wants to go entirely the natural route. Processed food almost always contains gluten for one reason or another, often just as a flavoring (malt), or to thicken, bind, stop stuff sticking together (grated cheese), as a carrier (in blue cheese), and so on. And if you buy a pack of something one time that you checked, and it was gluten free, it doesn’t mean that another pack bought on the same day or on a different day will also be gluten free.

Manufacturers change ingredients without any warning or mention on the front of the pack, depending on price and availability. So the only way to be safe, if you’re buying processed food not specificatlly labeled “gluten free” (and sometimes even if it is), you have to Check the Ingredients Label of Every Pack Every Time You Buy.

Having said that, there are lots of foods that are gluten free. Meat (not meat products), fish, non-blue cheese bought in a block or sliced (not necessarily processed cheese), eggs, fruit, vegetables and nuts are all gluten free, so long as there is no coating or sauce.

There is a set of cereals called Chex, in lots of different varieties that is changing over to a gluten free recipe. Check every pack before you buy as there are still some “normal” ones out there. The gluten free ones have a flash on the front that says “gluten free”.

Many pizza places and other restaurants like PF Changs do gluten free menus. It’s impossible to know how thorough they are about avoiding cross-contamination, though. There’s a lways a risk if you have a kitchen that prepares gluten free food alongside the normal stuff that some gluten will get transferred accidentally.

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Gluten Free Handbook

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Posted by GlutenFree - May 3, 2013 at 1:24 pm

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Q&A: Do Celiacs always feel bad (stomach, GI issues) after eating gluten everytime?

Question by Rumbly: Do Celiacs always feel bad (stomach, GI issues) after eating gluten everytime?
If yes, was this only since you were diagnosed and went gluten-free? Or did this happen before you realized you had celiac?

Best answer:

Answer by tiggsy
Once they have been following the gluten free diet for a number of months, and the lesions have had a chance to heal, there should not be any issues after eating, unless the food contained gluten.

Celiacs who have been “glutened” will feel bad after eating. This isn’t particularly unusual – although it is dangerous – especially if they eat out at a restaurant or even go to a friend’s house for dinner.

Feeling bad after eating gluten is often the symptom that prompts a visit to the doctor, and eventual diagnosis of celiac disease.

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Posted by GlutenFree - January 12, 2013 at 1:21 pm

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Q&A: Food ideas for people with Celiac’s disease?

Question by potentiallywonderful: Food ideas for people with Celiac’s disease?
A friend has been diagnosed with wheat/gluten allergy. Can anyone suggest any good meal tips?

Best answer:

Answer by Anama

Sure. First you need the unsafe list:
http://www.celiac.com/articles/182/1/Unsafe-Gluten-Free-Food-List-Unsafe-Ingredients/Page1.html

Is it allergies (histamine) or Celiac (autoimmune response)? or both?
Allergies you have to act differently around (possibly nothing even airborne) because it could result in breathing issues, celiac is just no cross contam or ingestion of gluten (which is in wheat,barley,rye, spelt, triticale, kamut, etc, etc.) . Thought I would ask, there is a biiiig difference. Also wheat free does not mean gluten free many times, so you need to be very careful about that when buying products . Also gluten free doesn’t necessarily mean wheat free (ex: in the UK wheat sugar is considered gf. If someone with wheat allergy ate it, they would be sick!). You just need to ask your friend to clarify for you so you won’t get them sick.

Anyway, here are my fav Celiac recipie sites, you can assume that they are wheat free :
http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com/
and here:
http://gluten-freerecipes.blogspot.com/

Otherwise, just plenty of whole fresh foods (especially in the beginning). There are plenty of gf products now, just look for hidden wheat/gluten products that could be present (barley grass, wheat grass, wheat sugar are considered gf in the UK and can be present in products made there).

Oh, and if celiac and newly diagnosed, NO DAIRY for several months while her villi heal, ok? (no villi tips, no lactase being produced)
Good luck! Hope this helps. Add details if you need more info., I’ll keep checking back.
Edit: Wow! who is the silly person that thumbs downed me? lol! Asker, you can assume this answer is 100% correct and can use the advice with confidence. Sometimes people just don’t know any better and do stuff like that! And sherbet is usually NOT safe, please do NOT give your friend sherbet unless you specifically check the label. Perry’s is gf, by the way.
p.p.s.. if you are thinking about cooking for him/her please be careful about cross contamination if you are a wheat/gluten eater. The most common areas? Cutting boards,toasters, wooden spoons, breadmakers,pizzabricks.
Please get the allergy/intolerance or both question answered as well.

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Gluten Free Handbook

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Posted by Chloe Boggs - December 10, 2012 at 2:53 pm

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The Wonders Of Celiac Disease?

Diseases are difficult to break. They are stone hard and can thrive in extreme conditions of the climate. It would take a lot of effort to smash it into tiny little pieces. What the previous sentences are trying to say is that understanding a disease in not some walk in the park. Curing it would also take a wild chase. There are instances that requires a tremendous amount of treatment in order to save the patient. With the help of the modern technology present nowadays, the people in the medical field still feel blinded about what the answer to the problem is. Some diseases are acquired through exposure. On the other hand, there are certain conditions that have been with you from the beginning of time. It is present in your own blood and circulation, just waiting for the right time catch you off guard.

One perfect example to that is Celiac Disease. It is a problem that can be inherited by an offspring from his or her parents. Celiac Disease is a condition brought about by allergens found in foodstuff. As known by many, it is a case where patients experience a stern reaction of the immune system to gluten. Gluten is a kind of protein commonly found in wheat, rye and barley which causes an inflammation to the linings of the small intestine and disrupts a person’s capacity to absorb mineral and nutrients. If left unattended, this condition can worsen into becoming a cruel case of gastrointestinal problem wherein symptoms may include weight loss, abdominal upset, bloating and a whole lot more.

Even with the presence of these symptoms, they may go unnoticed. But they are still there, continuously destroying the insides of your body. Furthermore, Celiac Disease take on different approach to different people. The symptoms are less likely to be the same in two different persons. One may have diarrhea while the other is constipated. Some may even lead to depression and irritability most especially in children.

As the days pass by, doctors are facing more and more disorder. The ones that they do not even know existed in the very first place. Studies recently showed that the list of disorders have included 80 more autoimmune diseases. With all that and more, the interest on Celiac Disease is still ongoing. And a lot of things are still yet to be discovered.

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Posted by Chloe Boggs - November 29, 2012 at 9:58 am

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Tips For A Celiac Disease Newbie

You feel a little odd lately. You think that there is something that sets you off your usual pace. You decide to visit the doctor just to see what’s up. There you are examined along with a holistic assessment of your entire being. Minutes later, you come out of the doctors room with a newly diagnosed condition called Celiac Disease. You feel like you have just been bombarded with lots of things. You are dumbfounded about what to do and where to start. So here are some basic tips in order to survive a life where you have to live with Celiac Disease.

Tip Number 1 – No To Wheat. Celiac Disease is a condition of the digestive system which requires being free from a protein called gluten which is found in most foodstuff. The most popular gluten rich product is wheat. The least of your priorities is to cause damage to your intestines. So better do away with wheat if you still want to live.

Tip Number 2 – Yes To Other Whole Grains. Given that you are not allowed to have any wheat based food, you can always opt for other whole grain products. Examples of which are corn and oats. However, this is not true to all. Some patients can tolerate them while others cant. Just see for yourself.

Tip Number 3 – Go For Gluten Free Breads. It is a fact that wheat and flour are ingredients used to make bread. But with the consideration to this condition, alternatives are already available in the market wherein the breads were created with wheat and flour excluded from the recipe.

Tip Number 4 – Go For Fruits, Vegetables and Meat. Most vegetables are safe to eat as well as fruits in general are often okay. They can be cooked however you want. Just keep in mind that the additives you will put in are also gluten free. When it comes to meat, since you cannot deem the protein from other food useful, then you can definitely acquire protein from meat. It is safe to eat poultry products too.

See? That was not so bad after all. The key to survival is knowing how to combat the enemy and in the end emerge as a winner. You may be diagnosed with Celiac Disease but at least you are still enjoying the food you eat.

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Posted by Chloe Boggs - November 16, 2012 at 2:47 pm

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For people w/ Celiac’s Disease and have previously ate gluten food products is there a difference in taste?

Question by B P: For people w/ Celiac’s Disease and have previously ate gluten food products is there a difference in taste?
Celiac Disease

Best answer:

Answer by Anama
In some products, of course. In other products, not so much. Glutino pretzels are actually BETTER than wheat pretzels. The breads, of course are different, but I like Le Garden Bakery (in New York) the best I have found so far (tastes like a rich european bread, but they are pretty much crumbly d/t lack of gluten).
Sorghum based beer tastes different, but I still like it, especially Bard’s Tale and Green’s.
Mi-Del cookies taste just like gluten based cookies. Since I already ate mostly whole, fresh foods, it really wasn’t that big of a deal to change over to gluten free.
For pasta: some pastas are def. different, but I really like Tinkyada (brown rice) and honestly can not tell the difference!

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Posted by GlutenFree - November 13, 2012 at 9:46 am

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Is it possible for someone to have Celiac’s disease but not have any digestive problems?

Question by Sarah Jane: Is it possible for someone to have Celiac’s disease but not have any digestive problems?

Best answer:

Answer by Carly
Definitely. I have Celiac and my only symptom at the time I was diagnosed was that I had started to break out in hives whenever I ate something with gluten. My dad has Celiac and because it’s a genetic disease (although I’ve heard of it being triggered in people with no family history of it) that’s where I started. If you go to celiaccentral.org you can find a list of symptoms, many of which have nothing to do with digestion. Celiac.com is also a good website for information. Some things I had written off as entirely different problems (eczema, tingling sensations in my back, etc.) are actually symptoms of Celiac and stopped once I got on the gluten-free diet.

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Gluten Free Handbook

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Posted by GlutenFree - October 31, 2012 at 1:47 pm

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Anyone have a gluten-free pizza crust recipe – I have celiac’s disease?

Question by Tammy P: Anyone have a gluten-free pizza crust recipe – I have celiac’s disease?
I love pizza and I take my gluten-free glutino bagels and make them into pizza

But I would love to make homemade pizza crust also

any good recipes- there are none online that i care for

Best answer:

Answer by ALEX
This gluten-free pizza crust recipe can be rolled out, just like traditional wheat dough. You can make a thin crusted New York style pizza or thick crusted Chicago style, you decide. Then load it with your favorite toppings.

Use this recipe for Homemade Gluten-Free Flour Blend or your favorite GF all-purpose flour blend.

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Ingredients:
3/4 cup Gluten Free All Purpose Flour Mix
3/4 cup tapioca flour
2 tablespoons dry buttermilk powder OR dry powdered milk OR Vance’s Dari-Free Powder
1 teaspoon Agar-Agar powder (Vegan ) OR unflavored gelatin powder
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons xanthan gum
1 package active dry yeast granules
1 teaspoons sugar OR 1/2 teaspoon honey OR agave nectar
2 teaspoons olive oil
1 1/2 teaspoons cider vinegar
1/2 cup lukewarm water (hot water will kill the yeast!)
Extra tapioca flour for rolling the pizza dough
Gluten Free cornmeal to sprinkle on baking sheet
Preparation:
Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper and sprinkle lightly with gluten free cornmeal.
Place all dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl and whisk until thoroughly mixed together.
Add sugar or honey or agave nectar, vinegar, olive oil and gradually add water.
Mix on high speed for 3 to 4 minutes.
Scrape the thick dough on to a large clean surface liberally sprinkled with tapioca flour.
Work enough tapioca flour into the dough so that it can be shaped into a large ball. With a large knife cut the dough in half to make two medium pizzas.

The key to shaping this dough is to continue to sprinkle the work surface and the dough with tapioca flour.

Shape each piece into a circle making sure to sprinkle enough tapioca flour on the dough and the work surface to prevent it from sticking.
With a rolling pin shape the dough into circles. Roll thin for New York style pizzas or thick for Chicago deep dish style.
Carefully place one prepared pizza crust on baking sheet or pizza stone (see tips) sprinkled with corn meal and bake for about 5 minutes or until the dough is firm. This is called parbaking. Repeat with second pizza.
Top pizzas with your favorite ingredients and bake an additional 7-10 minutes or until done. Or cool parbaked crusts, wrap and freeze for convenience.

Yield: 1 large, or 2 medium or 3 small pizza crusts

Tip

A pizza stone creates crisp crusts by absorbing moisture in dough. If you like your pizzas crisp consider using a pizza stone.

Reminder: Always make sure your work surfaces, utensils, pans and tools are free of gluten. Always read product labels. Manufacturers can change product formulations without notice. When in doubt, do not buy or use a product before contacting the manufacturer for verification that the product is free of gluten.

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Gluten Free Handbook

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Posted by GlutenFree - October 22, 2012 at 1:48 pm

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Q&A: Can you have a wheat allergy and not have Celiac’s disease?

Question by life_in_motion: Can you have a wheat allergy and not have Celiac’s disease?
or are they the same thing? I recently discovered that foods with wheat in them make me sick to my stomach and give me nasty headaches. Is Celiac the name for wheat allergies, or is that different?

Best answer:

Answer by shahzad
Celiac Disease is an “autoimmune disease”. The body just can not absorb gluten (proteins that are found in wheat, rye, barley, and grains derived from them). Some antibodies are formed against the gluten proteins and cause a reaction every time one eats such diet. Over time, the absorption sites in the Gastrointestinal system ( Villi ) become messed up and cant absorb any food at all and that can be very very serious. The only way to stay healthy is to avoid gluten from diet throughout life.

However, one can have wheat intolerance (allergy without any antibody formation) and still not have gluten intolerance (Celiac disease with specific antibody formation).

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Gluten Free Handbook

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Posted by GlutenFree - January 10, 2012 at 9:45 am

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Gluten Safe & Unsafe Ingredient List: The Fundamental Pocket Guide For Celiacs

Gluten Safe & Unsafe Ingredient List: The Fundamental Pocket Guide For Celiacs

What happens when a Certified Sports Nutritionist is diagnosed with Celiac Disease? An action plan like no other, designed in a format that can be read and applied the same day. This guide is not meant to be an encyclopedia discussing Celiac. It is a quick guide that spares the reader from painful trial & error, provides a list of safe ingredients that can be used to do grocery shopping (note: not a grocery guide – as those can be outdated before even printed! manufacturers change ingredients very often. this guide provides actual ingredients you can check on labels which is the only way to eat safely), and cautions where all the hidden dangers are. This guide incredulously can make anyone Celiac-saavy very quickly. One of two books by the same author, this version contains a list of safe and unsafe ingredients in a slim, pocketbook format that makes it easy to have on hand while grocery shopping or carry anywhere. Also, the essential basics of where to look for hidden dangers and how food processing affects the food we buy. A fantastic tool for Celiacs looking for the slimmest guide possible. The second book “Celiac Disease: Safe Food List and Essential Information on Living With A Gluten Free Diet”, includes all of the above information, but also contains vitamin and supplement information, a brief section addressing Celiac’s relation to depression, and several ideas on how to make a smooth – even enjoyable – transition to living a gluten free life. Still in a pocketbook format with only 30 additional pages, also available on Amazon.com. If you suffer from Celiac or have gluten intolerance or allergies, you simply can’t go without this handy guide!

List Price: $ 12.99

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Gluten Free Handbook

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Posted by GlutenFree - December 12, 2011 at 12:00 pm

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