Posts tagged "Intolerance."

Are acne and gluten intolerance related?

Question by Johnny K: Are acne and gluten intolerance related?
I take pretty good care of my face by washing it, not touching it, and stuff. But I still have acne. I have tried stuff like putting lemon and toothpaste on it, but its stubborn. I’m pretty frustrated. But then I heard somewhere that gluten intolerance and acne are related. I have the celiac gene and gluten intolerance, but I still eat wheat. Would me stop eating wheat help my acne go away?

Best answer:

Answer by Antonio
Yes the two things are related. Your skin is an organ its job is to detoxify your body, and protect your insides, and it has plenty of jobs but a large part of it is to detoxify.

When you load your body with toxins your skin releases them, and you get zits, oily poors theory of acne isnt true, you need a healthy diet.

Also avoid all dairy products, unles of course you get raw organic milk froma farm.

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Posted by GlutenFree - January 10, 2013 at 1:38 pm

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Q&A: What vitamins should I take if I have celiac disease and lactose intolerance?

Question by Aphotic45: What vitamins should I take if I have celiac disease and lactose intolerance?
I take calcium tablets every now and then.

Best answer:

Answer by Nurse Diesel
Since both celiac and lactose intolerance will make it difficult for you to digest and extract nutrients from food, it would probably benefit you to supplement all vitamins. You’ll need to pay for them, and probably go to a health food store to find some that don’t have gluten or dairy in them, and they’ll be fairly spendy.
In addition, eating nutrient-dense foods can also help. Cod Liver Oil combined with High Vitamin Butter Oil (link below) is an easy way to supplement all the fatty vitamins, which are essential for hormone production (which run your body). Also adding organic coconut oil to your diet will help. Since Celiac and lactose intolerance can both disrupt your gut flora, you should probably supplement that as well. You can use probiotic capsules for this (found in fridge section at a health food store, and also expensive), or you can make fermented foods at home and supplement yourself less expensively – beverages like Kombucha and Beet Kvass are very nutritive and easy to make at home. You can use the whey from yoghurt to make your own pickled vegetables, and it shouldn’t bother your stomach even though whey is taken from a dairy product.

Organ meats, like liver and sweetbreads are also very nutrient dense – though I must confess I have yet to be brave enough to try them. But I do like pate, so that’s one way you might try.

I recommend a cookbook/nutritional encyclopedia called “Nourishing Traditions” that is available at health food stores or on Amazon for about $ 25 or so.

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Posted by GlutenFree - September 27, 2012 at 1:41 pm

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Q&A: Gluten-free diet without celiac disease or intolerance?

Question by : Gluten-free diet without celiac disease or intolerance?
Is it safe/ can you maintain a gluten-free diet without having a gluten intolerance or celiac disease? Also how would you make the transition?

Best answer:

Answer by ★☆W.a.b.b.y✿❀
Why would you want to?

A gluten free diet is expensive and the food is less than average. There are people who have to be gluten free and wish that they weren’t.

Gluten free food is low in fiber and often doesn’t have the same vitamins and minerals found in the gluten containing equivalents. Gluten free food is high in sugar and fat.

When people withdraw from gluten they often get very fatigued and have headaches for the first few weeks.

So if you can put up with feeling tired, having headaches, being constipated, putting on weight and being at risk of a vitamin deficiency all while paying more money to eat food that doesn’t taste very nice, then sure, go for it.

I would recommend you speak to your doctor about this before making any changes to your diet.

…..

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Posted by GlutenFree - September 19, 2012 at 1:39 pm

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Q&A: Found that I have gluten intolerance from my ALCAT test, would that mean I may have celiac disease?

Question by Bing O: Found that I have gluten intolerance from my ALCAT test, would that mean I may have celiac disease?
Do I need to further take test like colonoscopy to confirm if i have it (CD) before I go on gluten-free diet?

Best answer:

Answer by sailor
You should do further testing. My understanding is that the ALCAT just shows whether or not you are sensitive to gluten. The gold standard for diagnosing celiac disease is an endoscopy which is a tube down your throat through your stomach to your small intestine and with a little med to help is not a big deal for most people. A colonoscopy is not used to diagnose celiac disease but may be used to see if there is damage caused by CD in the large intestine. And a negative endoscopy now doesn’t preclude a positive test sometime in the future. If you test negative, you might want to have genetic testing done to see if you have the genetics for CD to know if you need to keep being followed for development of CD later in life.
Good luck!!!

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Gluten Free Handbook

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Posted by GlutenFree - May 18, 2012 at 3:56 pm

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Is Self-Testing Any Good For Food Intolerance?

A doctor’s say is the most reliable when it comes to diagnosing your food intolerance. But here and there, we all want to do self-testing first before booking a trip to our trusted physicians. Why certainly, just like anything else, it has it advantages and disadvantages.

Self-testing for certain food intolerances actually has a lot of pros. However, before engaging yourself in such, be sure to know beforehand all its cons, just to be on the safer side of things.

One main example of the self-testing’s advantages is the fact that you can absolutely cut back on costs. If you don’t have enough resources to undergo high-end medical testing, this is actually helpful. It’s better than not having any tests at all, so to speak.  Nevertheless, it can be inaccurate, and it all depends on the root cause of your food intolerance. But it’s actually more accurate than the conventional allergy tests.

If the symptoms that are surfacing mainly involve discomfort, and nothing really life-threatening, then it boils down to how you feel.

False positive means avoiding foods that seem to do you pretty well. Avoiding such foods restricts your diet, sad to say, pointlessly. Say, if you undergo a self-test and you come up with a false positive result, then you would have to adhere to a strict gluten-free diet which is a total pain in the neck.

A lot of people, albeit without being diagnosed with Celiac disease, are suggested to avoid wheat, say, those who have blood type of O. But it’s totally different from completely ditching it.

One of the major cons in self-testing for food intolerances is, as mentioned above, inaccuracy. To be sure, a proper test for Celiac should be done so you’ll be advised of how important it is to avoid gluten at all costs.

Conventional allergy testing can also be very handy as it provides you with a short-list of foods to avoid as you self-test for food intolerances. It’s still best to go to your doctor, but self-testing can be practical in one way or another.

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Posted by Chloe Boggs - January 26, 2012 at 1:32 pm

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Gluten and Obesity

Some time ago, celiac disease was, by some means connected to muscle wasting or failure to thrive in children. It usually gets in the way of the body’s capacity to absorb nutrients. Thus, it can impede growth and can be the grounds for developmental problems that have something to do with malnutrition.

Because of the impacts and effects of severe cases of celiac disease, before, it was typically diagnosed only in kids that were emaciated or those who had obvious health problems.

Recent studies have shown that some people that are diagnosed with celiac or gluten allergy are more likely to gain weight. Statistics say that roughly around 10% of the world population has problems with gluten.

Our bodies are hardwired to gain weight to save us from famine. As famine approaches, we tend to binge eat and do so compulsively. In cases that somehow mimic this scenario, say, we are taking in way less nutrition than we normally should, we then develop these compulsive eating behavior. And for those affected with celiac disease or those intolerant of it, it usually doesn’t matter what nutrients can be found in the foods since the body can’t digest and absorb it properly anyway.

If a child shows signs of compulsive eating habits, there are some effective remedies to this. Counseling and attempting to raise activity levels are ones that are known to be useful to many, although there are still some children that are considered as exception to this.

What’s making it all the more difficult is that the bad eating habits are not merely about the behavior, but it is of genetic response to gluten. That is the reason why it is essential to consider this rather than try to force behavior modification unto your children.

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Posted by Chloe Boggs - January 18, 2012 at 9:28 am

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Gluten-Free Life

Unfortunately, people diagnosed with Celiac disease have to stay away from gluten for the rest of their lives. It’s not pure bad though since a lot of people who are on a gluten-free diet claim to be feeling better than ever, having more energy and some are even losing weight and get to maintain it.

When on a gluten-free diet, you are expected to avoid all wheat and related grain products. Thus, you have to look for alternatives such as flour made from rice. This is not impossible these days as more and more health food stores are offering gluten-free products.

Furthermore, you should be cautious with hidden gluten in vegetable proteins such as soy and malt, as well as modified food starches. Always check the label of condiments that you purchase such as soy sauce and see to it that they are gluten-free.

Health experts also suggest having small frequent meals to maintain energy levels throughout the day and it also facilitates faster healing of the digestive tract if you have just recently started being gluten-free. While at it, it’s best to eat at a slow pace and chew your food thoroughly so you bring out more digestive juices.

As much as you can, avoid downing any liquid when eating to prevent your stomach acid from getting diluted. By doing so, your digestion will be working at its best, making you absorb nutrients even better.

Dining out can be quite tricky, but you can do so by educating yourself beforehand. Choose restaurants that offer healthy options and always ask and let them know you have specific needs. It’s best to keep track of what you eat and be observant with regard to your body every after eating.

Living gluten-free isn’t all burden, it may actually be your ticket to a healthier living.

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Posted by Chloe Boggs - January 12, 2012 at 12:35 pm

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Celiac Disease: A Guide to Living with Gluten Intolerance

Celiac Disease: A Guide to Living with Gluten Intolerance

Celiac disease is a digestive disorder caused by a sensitivity to the protein gluten in wheat flour, which in turn can damage the small intestine and inhibit the body’s absorption of nutrients from food. The disease is hereditary and can affect entire families. Cowritten by a registered nurse who lives with celiac disease, a dietician, and a clinical pharmacist, this indispensable guide tackles all aspects of the disease, including symptoms, diagnosis, management, complications, and current research. While many cookbooks and dietary manuals on gluten intolerance exist, Celiac Disease is the only book on how to live fully and richly while maintaining a gluten-free lifestyle. In addition to learning how to set up and maintain a gluten-free kitchen, readers find strategies for tackling emotional issues, nutrition and dietary guidelines, tips for dining out, and advice on raising a celiac child.

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Posted by GlutenFree - August 22, 2011 at 3:21 pm

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Healthier Without Wheat: A New Understanding of Wheat Allergies, Celiac Disease, and Non-Celiac Gluten Intolerance.

Healthier Without Wheat: A New Understanding of Wheat Allergies, Celiac Disease, and Non-Celiac Gluten Intolerance.

  • ISBN13: 9780976853794
  • Condition: New
  • Notes: BRAND NEW FROM PUBLISHER! 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. Tracking provided on most orders. Buy with Confidence! Millions of books sold!

This is the leading resource for discovering your wheat allergy or gluten intolerance. For millions of people, bread, pasta, and many other foods are bad for their health. Thousands of people have already come to their own realization that they are healthier without wheat in their diet, but it can be difficult to figure out when most doctors aren t knowledgeable on the topic. This book provides validation for what these people have discovered, and explains how you too can determine whether or not wheat and gluten are making you sick.

In Healthier Without Wheat you learn the difference between celiac disease, non-celiac gluten intolerance, and wheat allergies. You will discover how hundreds of health problems are connected to wheat and gluten reactions and why sorting this out on your own can be more difficult than you might think. You will also discover how you can be gluten intolerant even if you don t have celiac disease, and why non-celiac gluten intolerance can be just as severe as or more severe than celiac disease.

You will also learn how to determine if your infant or child reacts to wheat or gluten. Healthier Without Wheat also covers nutritional deficiencies commonly seen in gluten intolerance, and equally important, what to do if you are avoiding gluten but not getting better. There are many books on living gluten free, but only one on how to determine whether or not you are gluten intolerant or have a reaction to wheat. You should read this book if you or someone you know suffers from any of the following: abdominal pain, chronic anemia (iron deficiency), arthritis, autoimmune diseases, constipation, depression, diarrhea, eczema, fatigue, fibromyalgia, frequent illness, headaches, heartburn, hypoglycemia, irritable bowel syndrome, irritability, migraines, or osteoporosis.

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Posted by GlutenFree - August 11, 2011 at 5:28 pm

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