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Is Gluten-Free For You?

By now, we know a lot of people should steer clear of gluten. A lot of us know what gluten is; it’s a protein abundant in wheat and other related grains. Others are still asking though, gluten is bad, yes, but isn’t protein good for us? Plus, wheat is not considered food, right?

Let’s begin with wheat gluten being a protein. All fruits, vegetables, and animal products have some amount of protein in them. Grain contains gluten, and it gives dough and batter their elasticity, their sponginess, and their good baking properties.

Luckily, most of us do not react extremely when we ingest gluten. As a matter of fact, wheat literally fees most of the world. Without it, there would be massive famine!

But just because someone doesn’t have celiac sprue disease doesn’t mean they don’t have allergic reactions to wheat, which is not very rare. People who have wheat allergies might notice joint pain, difficulty breathing, and itchy or irritated skin. One ideal way to know if you are allergic to wheat is staying away from it and observe how you feel. Gradually reintroduce wheat into your system three days later and observe again. Try isolating the wheat as much as you can through getting rid of eliminating any other foods or including anything new along with the wheat.

So let’s get back to the question earlier. Is protein good for us? Of course. No arguments there. But not every protein. Mad cow disease is literally a protein that just can’t unfold the right way. Gluten is a protein that is typically easily denatured in the stomach and absorbed in the uppermost part of the small intestine. That said, is the protein known as gluten good for a celiac sufferer? NO. Again, no arguments there.

 

Gluten Free Handbook

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Posted by Chloe Boggs - October 31, 2013 at 3:33 pm

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How is gluten free wheat made?

Question by Tecpeds: How is gluten free wheat made?
I know there are many types like quinoa, buckwheat, millet amarnth, etc. which are all naturally gluten free but I have eaten wheat pasta which is gluten free how do they remove the gluten in wheat when it has gluten naturally unless I’m wrong. Thanks.

Best answer:

Answer by The Unknown Chef
The gluten in wheat flour is in the endosperm or the center of the wheat kernel, it is not chemically treated like the other people say, it is a matter for removing the part that has the gluten factor and grinding the rest into flour.

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Gluten Free Handbook

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Posted by GlutenFree - May 10, 2013 at 1:46 pm

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My girlfriend just got diagnosed with Celiacs disease. I need a list of some Gluten-Free foods?

Question by Youth in Asia: My girlfriend just got diagnosed with Celiacs disease. I need a list of some Gluten-Free foods?
Anybody actually have a gluten free diet? I know the stuff you can pull off Google, like arrowhead root and stuff but I’d like some practical stuff. Like McD’s Fries I hear are acceptable. Anybody got great meal ideas or anything?

Best answer:

Answer by tiggsy
Nope. Macdonalds fries are not edible for celiacs. They are reconstituted with flour.

So far as fast food goes, most of it will be off the menu for your gf. Even the odd bits, like salad without dressing, may well be contaminated by being handled with implements that were previously used for other things.

There are places you can get gluten free food to go, but they are not your regular places, mostly. Though I believe that Wendy’s salad bar has a fairly good selection – but since it’s serve it yourself, it’s very likely somebody will have used the same spoon to pick up croutons and then salad… cross contamination.

Even a hint of gluten will damage your gf’s health. The life exptectancy of celiacs has been shown to be directly related to how well they adhere to a 100% gluten free diet.

Gluten is the protein in wheat, rye, barley, spelt and a few other closely related grains. It’s not in corn, rice, or oats, although oats are mostly contaminated during processing, so you would need to buy ones that are certified gluten free (meaning they were processed in a gluten free environment).

Your girlfriend is going to get a crash course in label reading – unless she wants to go entirely the natural route. Processed food almost always contains gluten for one reason or another, often just as a flavoring (malt), or to thicken, bind, stop stuff sticking together (grated cheese), as a carrier (in blue cheese), and so on. And if you buy a pack of something one time that you checked, and it was gluten free, it doesn’t mean that another pack bought on the same day or on a different day will also be gluten free.

Manufacturers change ingredients without any warning or mention on the front of the pack, depending on price and availability. So the only way to be safe, if you’re buying processed food not specificatlly labeled “gluten free” (and sometimes even if it is), you have to Check the Ingredients Label of Every Pack Every Time You Buy.

Having said that, there are lots of foods that are gluten free. Meat (not meat products), fish, non-blue cheese bought in a block or sliced (not necessarily processed cheese), eggs, fruit, vegetables and nuts are all gluten free, so long as there is no coating or sauce.

There is a set of cereals called Chex, in lots of different varieties that is changing over to a gluten free recipe. Check every pack before you buy as there are still some “normal” ones out there. The gluten free ones have a flash on the front that says “gluten free”.

Many pizza places and other restaurants like PF Changs do gluten free menus. It’s impossible to know how thorough they are about avoiding cross-contamination, though. There’s a lways a risk if you have a kitchen that prepares gluten free food alongside the normal stuff that some gluten will get transferred accidentally.

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Gluten Free Handbook

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Posted by GlutenFree - May 3, 2013 at 1:24 pm

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Can I cure costochondritis caused by celiac disease by fasting?

Question by Dora: Can I cure costochondritis caused by celiac disease by fasting?
I know I should have just stuck to my diet but I didn’t. I’ve been in pain for so long and it’s just ruining my life for the past year. If I don’t eat for a few days anything but raw canned pumpkin and green tea will it go away?

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Answer by Elizabeth
Look up juice fasting on google, as a way to get back to health. You are probably not ready for a water fast. A water fast can be detrimental to a persons health if one goes on it too soon.

Green juices for fasting. Green smoothies if you want to work your digestive system, but help it digest your foods better by breaking down the foods in a blender instead of your mouth.

When you juice fast, your body will put hardly any work towards digestion and will put all its energy toward healing your body.

The body can get very skinny during this process, and it is recommended to see a doctor to have a blood test before going on any fast.

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Gluten Free Handbook

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Posted by GlutenFree - April 18, 2013 at 1:48 pm

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How much weight will I lose if I stay on a gluten-free diet?

Question by Julia: How much weight will I lose if I stay on a gluten-free diet?
i just found out that i am allergic to gluten. I also have celiac disease. am i going to be skinny if i stay on a all gluten-free diet? or am i going to get fatter? ALSO…..***how much weight will i lose by June?*** that really doesnt matter but i was just wondering if this is going to affect my weight and how i look.

Best answer:

Answer by mim
Depends what gluten free things you eat.
You could put on weight as a lot of the things are higher in calories, or you could lose, it really depends on your food CHOICES. (and how many calories you are consuming) And of course how much exercise you are doing. gluten free is better for one’s gut I think anyway – obviously is for you as you are allergic.

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Gluten Free Handbook

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Posted by GlutenFree - April 16, 2013 at 1:47 pm

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How is gluten free wheat made?

Question by Tecpeds: How is gluten free wheat made?
I know there are many types like quinoa, buckwheat, millet amarnth ect.. which are all naturally gluten free but i have eaten wheat pasta which is gluten free how do they remove the gluten in wheat when it has gluten naturally unless im wrong. Thanks.

Best answer:

Answer by Zillah
How to Make Bread Gluten

By Susan Reynolds, eHow Contributor

Making wheat gluten bread is easy and fun to do with this simple recipe. Gluten is a type of protein found in almost all breads unless they are exclusively labeled “gluten free.” Extra gluten makes bread fluffier and lighter and helps it rise higher. Flour that contains a lot of protein will make very strong gluten, whereas low-protein flours are good for making pastries. You can make gluten balls at home using some simple ingredients like flour, water, and your own hands.

and “One gluten free unleavened bread recipe.”

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Gluten Free Handbook

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Posted by GlutenFree - April 3, 2013 at 1:30 pm

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Where can I buy best gluten free flour?

Question by sam: Where can I buy best gluten free flour?
Where can I buy best gluten free flour and flour mixes. I heard that gluten free recipes and products are the best solution for autism and gluten intolerance. Also I like to know about the price details of the gluten free flour of different companies. Many companies advertise themselves saying they sell good flour, but I could not find the quality in those gluten free flour. The reply is deeply appreciated.
Thanks in advance.

Best answer:

Answer by Dani

Hodgson Mill sells lots of gluten-free flours online. You can either buy a few different flours and combine them, or buy all-purpose gluten-free flour (Arrowhead Mill sells it). With both you need to use xanthum gum, to make it rise, which you should be able to get at Bob’s Red Mill (I order online). The amount of xanthum gum you need depends on the specific recipe, but you can just google it.

Here are two combinations of flours (can be substituted cup-for-cup):

1/4 cup soy flour
1/4 cup tapioca flour
1/2 cup brown rice flour

OR

6 cups white rice flour
2 cups potato starch
1 cup tapioca flour

I’ve used the first one more, and the all-purpose. They’re pretty good, but usually pretty dry. Using 1 packet of “flavorless” gelatin helps retain moisture.

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Gluten Free Handbook

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Posted by GlutenFree - March 25, 2013 at 1:54 pm

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I have Celiac disease and CAN’T LOSE ANY WEIGHT?

Question by waitingmissy: I have Celiac disease and CAN’T LOSE ANY WEIGHT?
I was recently diagnosed with Celiac disease and since going on a gluten free diet I can’t seem to lose an ounce of weight!! Does anyone have any suggestions/diet plans that worked for them??

Best answer:

Answer by tiggsy
A little known fact – which manufacturers of diet foods rely on for their continued existence – is that reducing food intake always results in weight gain in the longer term. This is because it causes a drop in your metabolic rate (the rate at which food is used up), as the body fights what it sees as the threat of starvation.

To raise your metabolic rate (so that you burn food faster), you need to do 45 minutes exercise which raises the heart rate every 72 hours. Once your metabolic rate is back to normal, you will most likely see a resulting loss of weight – or at least fat (though you may gain muscle, which also weighs something),

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Gluten Free Handbook

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Posted by GlutenFree - March 19, 2013 at 1:55 pm

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How does eating gluten-free affect your weight?

Question by Hannah Banana: How does eating gluten-free affect your weight?
I’m trying to go gluten-free. I’ve heard it makes you lose weight, and I’ve also heard that it makes you gain weight. What exactly does it do and WHY?

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Answer by Apathy
It does to some extent, but at the end, it all depends on calories. Gluten free products doesn’t spike your blood as much as sugar. When your blood gets spiked, you tend to gain more fat, only if you are on a calorie surplus though, if no calorie surplus, then gluten free or not, it doesn’t matter.

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Gluten Free Handbook

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Posted by GlutenFree - March 15, 2013 at 1:32 pm

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Can going gluten free make you sick?

Question by Priscilla: Can going gluten free make you sick?
I went gluten free about 7 days ago to see if I have celiac disease. I need to be on this trial for a month. At first I was seeing some improvements in my health but now I am really hungry and sick to my stomach when I don’t eat.

Best answer:

Answer by fibrohubby
It could be that your body is adjusting, or has become more sensitive to small amount of gluten you are ingesting. My wife has been gluten free for almost two months. The first week or two she felt much better, but more recently she seems to have reactions to even the smallest amount of gluten. I would suggest checking all your food, cosmetics and medications/vitamins for hidden gluten, and maybe keep a food journal to pinpoint what might be making you feel worse.

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Gluten Free Handbook

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Posted by GlutenFree - March 12, 2013 at 1:31 pm

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